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Predicting the development trend of modern civilization from the demise of ancient Egyptian civilization

Describing the demise of the Old Kingdom of Egypt, an archaeologist who found the tomb of one of the rulers of the period warns that history could be repeated in our civilization.

 PredictingthedevelopmenttrendofmoderncivilizationfromthedemiseofancientEgyptiancivilization

The discovery of the tomb of Kentkause Third, Queen of the Ancient Kingdom of Egypt, could contain some horrible news for today's humanity, the Daily Express reports.

The discovery of the tomb, as well as the inscriptions and artifacts found in it, which give an insight into the Queen's life that "was not so glamorous", helped to shed light on the "evil fate of Old Kingdom history", says Professor Miroslav Barta, team leader of Czech archaeologists who found the tomb.

Barta explained that during that period, the Old Kingdom faced "major critical factors" such as the "terrible impact of nepotism" and "climate change" that led to the "disintegration of the pyramid-builder era".

- Without the rainfall there was no expected harvest, and because of the bad taxes there was no means to service the state apparatus and maintain the state ideology and integrity of the country - the archeologist explained.

Barta noted that history can be repeated, as indicated by the climate change that our planet is facing today.

- There are many parallels to our modern world, which also faces many internal and external challenges. By studying the past, we can learn much more about the present. We are not much different from the people of the time, although people always think that 'this time is different' and that we are different, but we are not - the archeologist thinks.

Barta adds that if we "accept the decline of civilization as fact, we will realize that falls are part of the natural course of things and one of the necessary steps leading to the resurrection."

"Then we'll be able to do something," Bart concluded.